Why We Choose To Slow Travel


The Nomad MBA_Blog_Slow Travel_1

Despite being a buzzword nowadays, did you know that ‘slow travel’ was actually born in Italy off the back of the slow living and slow food movement in the late 1980s? The Italians live la vita bella (the beautiful life), so family meals tend to linger, they love an afternoon siesta (I mean, who wouldn’t?) and rather than focusing on being on time, the emphasis is on how that time is spent.

 

It all comes as a quest for authenticity, quality and connections

 

Unlike our parents’ generation when it comes to travel, which is likely planned around all-inclusive resort packages and exhausting sightseeing checklists, millennials have the privilege to approach travel as a journey to discover who we are, open up to mindful conversations with your travel partners and with locals you meet along the way, and immerse ourselves in our surroundings. It’s experiencing the freedom in slowing down, doing less, disconnecting from your reality and being present.

 Photo credit: @claudiabrosel

Photo credit: @claudiabrosel

With our fast-paced, always-connected and high- achieving #FOMO lifestyles, it should come at no surprise that our generation is the driving force behind this mindset that brings us back to the roots of why we travel.  

This is why we practise slow travel on our programs. We live in each country for one month, long enough to live each culture, build new habits and shift your mindset about your environment. The emphasis on building authentic connections - with the local community, the culture and the environment - is extremely powerful in driving the educational journey and emotional challenges we want our tribes to experience being put out of their comfort zone.

This way of travelling isn’t always simple and planned, and requires an openness to overcome obstacles and a sense of curiosity to leave things up to chance

 Photo credit: @benagram_

Photo credit: @benagram_

Slow travel isn’t for everyone. But our tribes thrive on it - it creates memories that are lasting rather than fleeting, experiences that are immersive (and not just shot on your phone) and human connections that transcend borders.